Help choose the new poet laureate of Michigan’s Upper Peninsula

2016-10-09-15-44-13You can help choose the next Poet Laureate of the Upper Peninsula! In 2017, a new Poet Laureate of the U.P. will be named for a two-year term. To serve as Laureate, the nominee must have a strong connection to the Upper Peninsula and agree to promote an appreciation of poetry and the region during their tenure. 

The final nominees for Poet Laureate of the U.P. were chosen by the public; out of a list of 17 names, the following six received the majority of votes. Congrats to all!

Martin Achatz

Sally Brunk
Kathleen Heideman
Kathleen Carlton Johnson
Beverly Matherne
Saara Myrene Raappana

The new Poet Laureate will be selected by public vote, as well. Check back soon for the start of the official voting period at http://www.readwritelive.org/poet-laureate-of-the-up.html.

BESTSELLER LIST FOR OCTOBER

screenshot-2016-11-28-15-02-03MICHIGAN BESTSELLER LIST FOR OCTOBER 2016

1) Nicole Curtis, Better Than New: Lessons I’ve Learned from Saving Old Homes (and How They Saved Me) (Artisan Books/Workman Publishing Company)

2) Landis Lain, Baby’s Daddy (Brown Girl Books)

3) Thomas C. Foster, How to Read Literature Like a Professor: A Lively and Entertaining Guide to Reading Between the Lines (Revised Edition) (Harper Perennial)

4) Kristin Bartley Lenz, The Art of Holding on and Letting Go (Elephant Rock Productions)

5) Tom Stanton, Terror in the City of Champions: Murder, Baseball, and the Secret Society that Shocked Depression-Era Detroit (Lyons Press)

6) Christopher Paul Curtis, The Watsons go to Birmingham—1963 (Yearling Books/Charles Scribner’s Sons)

7) Dave Coverly, Night of the Living Shadows: A Speed Bump & Slingshot Misadventure (Henry Holt and Company/Macmillan)

8) Kristina Riggle, Vivian in Red (Polis Books)

9) Vince Flynn, Order to Kill: A Mitch Rapp Novel (Atria Books/Simon & Schuster)

10) John U. Bacon, Endzone: The Rise, Fall, and Return of Michigan Football (St. Martin’s Press)

 U.P. BESTSELLER LIST FOR OCTOBER 2016

1) Joy Morgan Dey, agate (Lake Superior Port Cities)

2) Eric Sevareid, Canoeing with the Cree: A 2,250-Mile voyage from Minneapolis to Hudson Bay (Borealis Books)

3) Margaret Noodin, Weweni: poems in Anishinaabemowin and English (Wayne State University Press) [tie]

3) Gerald Wykes, A Beaver Tale: The Castors of Conners Creek (Wayne State University Press) [tie]

5) Jerry Dennis, Canoeing Michigan Rivers: A Comprehensive Guide to 45 Rivers (Completely Revised & Updated) (Thunder Bay Press)

6) Betsy Bowen, Tracks in the Wild (University of Minnesota Press) [tie]

6) Beatrice H. Castle, The Grand Island Story (John M. Longyear Research Library) [tie]

6) Ron Strickland, The North Country Trail: The Best Walks, Hikes, and Backpacking Trips on America’s Longest National Scenic Trail (University of Michigan Press) [tie]

6) Anton Treuer, Everything You Wanted to Know about Indians But Were Afraid to Ask (Borealis Books) [tie]

10) Mardi Link, Wicked Takes the Witness Stand: A Tale of Murder and Twisted Deceit in Northern Michigan (University of Michigan Press)

The Michigan Best Seller List for October 2016, compiled by Ron Riekki from eleven Michigan bookstores: The Book Beat in Oak Park, www.thebookbeat.com; Bookbug in Kalamazoo, bookbugkalamazoo.com; Dog Ears Books in Northport, www.dogearsbooks.net/; Great Lakes Books & Supply in Big Rapids, greatlakesbook.com; Falling Rock Café and Bookstore in Munising, fallingrockcafe.com; Nicola’s Books in Ann Arbor, nicolasbooks.com; North Wind Books in Hancock, bookstore.finlandia.edu; Pages Bookshop in Detroit, http://www.pagesbkshop.com/; Saturn Booksellers in Gaylord, www.saturnbooksellers.com; and Schuler Books & Music in Grand Rapids, Lansing, and Okemos,schulerbooks.com.  These stores support Michigan books, authors, and publishers.

 

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Marquette, Michigan: Landing

BY ANDREA HOYT

This essay is part of the Great Lakes Review’s Narrative Map project. 

Our lives play out indoors. We are caged animals and mostly we like it t10399593_1074358783762_7630_nhis way. The sensations of earthly dependence have left our bodies but they linger somewhere else, and we resent the wind in the trees for being such a tease. But we had a beach once. It wasn’t exactly ours but we seemed to credit ourselves with its presence. It was ours but we did not buy it and we did not make it. We did not grind the sand that sloped so slowly into the cold Superior. We did not mold the sandstone into cliffs and paint them wildly with mineral powders. We were not here 500 million years ago.  But we have descended the gentle slopes, uncomfortable and exposed, waiting for the water to rise and rescue us from our ambivalence. We have seen the light of our fires thrown against the cliffs. We have kissed each other while the Aurora Borealis blazed above us. And often we were drunk. And on those nights Superior was gentler and we could feel our bare bodies become small and tight beneath the water as we darted from rock to rock. We felt that to fly could not be better than this.

There are other people on our beach now and they’ve had to pay for the privilege, five dollars I’m told. I imagine them removing their shoes, rolling up their pants, and loitering on the threshold, bouncing forward and back with the waves. This makes them feel youthful and they’re grateful for it. They comment on the frigid water and its bigness. A lake and not an ocean! Eventually they roll their pants up even higher, so high that it squeezes their calves painfully. They regret not wearing shorts but what does it matter if their pants get a little wet? Later, at home, they open one of the good bottles of wine. They can still feel the bitter Superior around their ankles. Their skin is tight and cold to the touch, but their limbs are light as they linger in the kitchen, raised, unawares, to the tips of their toes on the linoleum.

Andrea Hoyt is a writer living in Fort Collins, Colorado where she edits several magazines. 

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Kirk Park, Michigan: The Beach at Lake Michigan

BY ALAN HARRIS

100_1402This essay is part of the Great Lakes Review’s Narrative Map project. 

Grandpa is usually quite the talker. There are only two things in the world that I know of that keeps him from talking to anybody and everybody still above ground—sleep and going to the beach.

“Who does he think he’s talking to?” Dad asked.

“Why don’t you get off your beach towel and ask him?” Mom replied.

It was the first Saturday of summer. We drove an hour to get to Lake Michigan. The endless water reminds people of the ocean, especially Grandpa.

“I’m not asking the old man anything,” Dad said. “He always keeps to himself when we go to the beach. Been that way for as long as I remember.”

I hear the ocean’s cleaner than any lake. I don’t know. I’m probably the only 11 year old that’s never seen the sea. Grandpa’s been to shores all over the world, places with funny names like Iwo Jima and Ford Island.

“Oh, that’s right. Talking to fathers doesn’t run in your family,” Mom said.

Lake Michigan was cold but the sun kept us warm. The beach smelled like sun tan lotion. The waves whispered whatever secrets they whisper while the seagulls chirp insults at each other or about us.

“He started that tradition,” Dad replied.

Mom looked around the beach like she was searching for someone. “That explains it.”

As a ladybug landed on my nose, a seagull swooped over my head trying to grab a Kit Kat out of my hand. While Mom and Dad kept talking, I thought to myself, Explains what?

“Explains what?” Dad asked.

Mom smiled, put her big sunglasses on and stretched out on a towel. Grandpa continued to keep close watch over the water, mumbling to himself. My little sister was showing off her stupid gymnastics as she walked by him—on her hands. Grandpa and I ignored her.

“Stop ignoring me,” Dad said to Mom. “Explains what?”

Mom answered as the sunshine lit up her face. “It explains why your oldest son isn’t here to enjoy the beach—with his father.”

Big brother Rob stayed at home again this year. He never goes with us to the beach anymore. He pretty much never goes on any family outings—unless Dad stays home. Grandpa stood at the shoreline for a good hour allowing the waves to gain ground on his toes, only to watch the water retreat again and again. When his quiet conversation with the wind finally wrapped up, Grandpa began walking up and down the beach like he was patrolling a perimeter. Marching up and down the beach as though waiting for orders to stand down. While Grandpa marched, my sister decided to prove just how annoying she could be. Shelby kicked sand all over my towel—even got on my Kit Kat. At Lake Michigan cartwheels are just a messy way to show off.

But with or without little sisters, with or without my family not-talking to each other, I love the beach at Lake Michigan—and I’m not the only one. I’ve noticed how ladybugs love the beach. Seagulls, who have never seen the sea, they love the beach too. It’s even possible that Grandpa loves the beach as much or more than any of us, despite his retreat into silence. The look in his glass eye, as it reflected the lake, looked to me like love. But still there was something in his good eye that made me cautious. Eleven-year-olds might not be right all the time. What I saw in that good eye of his could have gone either way. If not love it might have been something closer to fear. Either way, I’ve never seen love or fear that deep in a good eye.

Maybe he was looking for something that was supposed to wash up on shore. Or he might just of been remembering something or someone just beyond the horizon—maybe both.  But nothing floated to shore this year. Nothing ever does. The only shadows upon the waves belonged to seagulls swooping towards us like fighter planes.

“Ooooh, look at the pretty birdie,” my sister pointed out with her toes as she stood on her head.

The white bird swooped in low from the water right at her.

“That’s a seagull, Stupid,” I said, as politely as a big brother can.

Grandpa squinted with his good eye as though he had recognized something—something he’d been waiting for. Standing bravely at attention before the seagull’s descent, Grandpa finally spoke up.

“That’s a strafing pattern,” he said softly.

“What’s a chafing pattern?” my sister asked. But Grandpa didn’t answer. He looked over at Dad, then the rest of us. He looked around at the ladybugs, seagulls and once again at the waves crawling across the peaceful sand—advancing on our position. I figured that whatever was on his mind had nothing to do with who’s talking to whom. There were hidden sights and sounds all around him. But none of us could see nor hear any of it. Not Dad. Not Mom. And Shelby never would. But Grandpa’s glass eye—now that’s another story. The glass eye sees everything. Everything that’s there, was there, and ever will be.

The glass eye saw all it wanted to see of Lake Michigan. Grandpa surveyed the sky in all directions before cautiously retreating to the safety of the parking lot.

Alan Harris is a 61 year-old hospice volunteer who assists patients in writing stories, letters and poetry. Harris is the 2011 recipient of the Stephen H. Tudor Scholarship in Creative Writing, the 2014 John Clare Poetry Prize, and the 2015 Tompkins Poetry Award from Wayne State University. In addition he is the father of seven, grandfather of seven, as well as a two-time Pushcart Prize nominee.

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Michigan bestseller list for September 2016

GREAT LAKES REVIEW MICHIGAN BESTSELLER LIST TOP 15 FOR SEP 2016

screenshot-2016-10-10-09-00-161) Kristin Bartley Lenz, The Art of Holding On and Letting Go (Elephant Rock Books/Elephant Rock Productions)

2) Jim Wallis, America’s Original Sin: Racism, White Privilege, and the Bridge to a New America (Brazos Press/Baker Publishing Group)

3) Peter Ho Davies, The Fortunes (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt)

4) Kelly DiPucchio, Everyone Loves Cupcake (Macmillan/Farrar, Straus and Giroux)

5) Brynne Barnes, Books Do Not Have Wings (Sleeping Bear Press)

6) Tom Rath, StrengthFinders 2.0 (Gallup Press)

7) Akhil Reed Amar, The Constitution Today: Timeless Lessons for the Issues of Our Era (Basic Books/Hachette Book Group)

8) Mitch Albom, Tuesdays with Morrie (Doubleday Knopf)

9) Bill Ayers, Demand the Impossible!: A Radical Manifesto (Haymarket Books)

10) Kelly DiPucchio, Dragon Was Terrible (Macmillan/Farrar, Straus and Giroux)

11) Deb Diesen, Pout-Pout Fish (Farrar, Straus and Giroux)

12) David Hollister, Second Shift: The Inside Story of the Keep GM Move (McGraw-Hill Education)

13) Viola Shipman, Charm Bracelet (Thomas Dunne Books)

14) Kristina Riggle, Vivian in Red (Polis Books)

15) Heather Ann Thompson, Blood in the Water: The Attica Prison Uprising (Pantheon/Knopf Doubleday)

 

GREAT LAKES REVIEW U.P. BESTSELLER LIST TOP 15 FOR SEP 2016

1) Nancy Coco, All You Need is Fudge: A Candy-Coated Mystery with Recipes (Kensington Publishing Corp)

2) William Kent Krueger, Manitou Canyon: A Novel (Atria Books/Simon & Schuster)

3) Josh MacIvor-Andersen, On Heights & Hunger (Outpost 19)

4) Jerry Dennis, The Living Great Lakes: Searching for the Heart of the Inland Seas (St. Martin’s Press/Macmillan)

5) John Smolens, “Wolf’s Mouth” (Michigan State University Press)

6) Steve Hamilton, A Cold Day in Paradise (St. Martin’s Press/Macmillan)

7) Duffy Brown, Geared for the Grave: a cycle path mystery (Berkley Publishing Group/Penguin Books)

8) Duffy Brown, Braking for Bodies: a cycle path mystery (Berkley Publishing Group/Penguin Books) [tie]

8) Eric Sevareid, Canoeing with the Cree (Borealis Books/Minnesota Historical Society Press) [tie]

8) James Magnuson, Agate Hunting Made Easy: How to Really Find Lake Superior Agates (Adventure Publications) [tie]

11) Denise Brennan-Nelson, Talullah, Mermaid of the Great Lakes (Sleeping Bear Press) [tie]

11) Loren Graham, A Face in the Rock: The Tale of a Grand Island Chippewa (University of California Press) [tie]

11) Mardi Link, Wicked Takes the Witness Stand (University of Michigan Press) [tie]

14) Emily St. John Mandel, Station Eleven: A Novel (Knopf Doubleday)

15) Margaret Noodin, Weweni: Poems in Anishinaabemowin and English (Wayne State University Press) [tie]

15) Abe Sauer, Goodnight Loon (University of Minnesota Press) [tie]

The Michigan Bestseller Lists and U.P. Bestseller List for September 2016, consists of seventeen participating Michigan bookstores: Between the Covers in Harbor Springs, facebook.com/btcbookstore; Book Beat in Oak Park, www.thebookbeat.com; Dog Eared Books in Northport, http://www.dogearedbooks.com/; Falling Rock Café & Bookstore in Munising, http://fallingrockcafe.com/; Great Lakes Books & Supply in Big Rapids, greatlakesbook.com; Island Bookstore in Mackinac City and on Mackinac Island, http://www.islandbookstore.com/; Kazoo Books in Kalamazoo, kazoobooks.com/; Michigan News Agency in Kalamazoo, http://www.michigannews.biz/; Nicola’s Books in Ann Arbor, nicolasbooks.com; North Wind Books in Hancock, bookstore.finlandia.edu; Pages Bookshop in Detroit, http://www.pagesbkshop.com/; Saturn Booksellers in Gaylord,www.saturnbooksellers.com; Schuler Books & Music in Grand Rapids, Lansing, and Okemos, schulerbooks.com.; and Snowbound Books in Marquette, http://www.snowboundbooks.com/.

Garrettsville, Ohio: Indian Summer

BY CAMERON GORMAN

This essay is part of the Great Lakes Review’s Narrative Map project. 

indian_summerHeat shimmers off of the lake, creating a strange in-between place that catches my thoughts and turns them into prayers for iced tea. The sun falls onto my dark hair, heating it to a fiery length.

I am floating there, suspended in the green-clear water, my legs pumping above the silt that sucks at my feet below. The fish turn in their lazy circles, watching, silent observers to my grandmother’s satisfaction as she turns her head upwards.

The rays catch her gently cragged face as she floats by me, her inner tube’s plastic surface crashing against the translucent waves as a ship breaks water. Her nose is high, it’s the Indian blood. Her hair falls delicately down her shoulders, the stark white of January cooling the stifling air.

I paddle harder against the distance and grasp her hand, slick with duckweed. The light spills over the top of her hair, gilding her expression as her eyes fly open.

I remember when we were both younger. Springtime, Easter, when I still wore dresses and she still painted her nails, dark red like blood. We looked for bones in the forest, muddy and filled with something unpinnable- fast butterfly wings.

She smiles and closes her eyes once more, the water lapping at both of us from the center of the lake. It bubbles up from somewhere underground, the sweet smell of the earth in its core.

It is cool against my body, but our arms extend across the translucent space and ignite.

Cameron Gorman is currently a student at Kent State University in Ohio. She works for the student-run newspaper and spends all of her free time writing. Her work will also appear in Work Literary Magazine in October. 

Elkhart, Indiana: The Long Afternoon

rural-indiana-1428941439jRbBY GARY V. POWELL

This essay is part of the Great Lakes Review’s Narrative Map project. It’s based on a real unsolved murder that haunted the town of Elkhart, Indiana in 1969. Warning: A graphic sexual assault is detailed in this essay. 

Did her assailant lie in wait, or did Mrs. S answer a knock at the door and welcome a stranger inside? No sign of forced entry the police said, so maybe she recognized the man. On the other hand, she might have left the door unlocked while out shopping, unwittingly inviting danger into her home. People trusted their neighbors in those days, and in a small, Indiana town on a county road, wasn’t everyone a neighbor.

She was allowed time to put the groceries away. She sorted mail, delivered her husband’s journals to his home office, passing photos of her three daughters in the hall—all those girls tall, leggy, and auburn-haired like their mother, fine-featured and green-eyed. All three damaged in their own way by what the oldest daughter, a high school junior at the time, would come to refer to as The Event.

Her naked body came to rest in the kitchen, between the breakfast nook and range, but signs of struggle appeared throughout the house—blood spatter, broken lamps, and toppled chairs. She bore bruises and other blunt-force trauma about her face and head. Defensive knife wounds marked her hands.

The man, some said monster, first violated her over the arm of the living room sofa. Stains from bodily fluids testified to the act. Her underpants, flung onto the back of a nearby wingchair, corroborated sequence and location. A large window, devoid of curtains or other treatments, invited viewing from a herd of Angus cows grazing in Denton’s fallow pasture a quarter mile below.

Authorities suspected that rather than ending quickly and mercifully, her ordeal endured throughout that long afternoon. Dress, stockings, and bra lay strewn room to room. Sheets and blankets twisted and writhed in a damp heap on the bed. The autopsy revealed both vaginal and anal penetration.

Two Coca Colas, each partially consumed, stood mute on a coffee table in the family room, leading some to believe that during a hiatus she attempted to pacify her attacker, reason with and convince him that no real harm had been done—why, having satisfied his lust, he could simply walk away, and she’d forget the entire incident.

The toilet seat remained up, the bowl unflushed. She may have tried to call for help, but the olive green telephone, ripped from the wall, was used to bludgeon, its cord to strangle. Folks wondered why they hadn’t heard her screams.

By the grace of God, friends said, the husband, a well-known banker, arrived home ahead of the girls, all three of whom were involved in after-school extra-curricular activities.

After discovering his wife’s body, Mr. S fled on-foot down the long, tree-lined driveway. He descended the hill to the Yoder residence, rang the doorbell, and blurted out his horrific news.

Suspicion settled first on the husband, but soon lifted when it was learned he’d consulted with clients all afternoon. Further inquiry exposed neither motive nor pathology on his part. Instead, all who knew the banker proclaimed him a devoted and loving husband.

In the months that followed, several patients at a nearby mental health clinic came under scrutiny. As it turned out, these usual suspects tendered either bullet-proof alibis or denials accompanied by a lack of evidence implicating them, forensic science not being then what it is today.

Some winked and assumed she’d kept a lover, attributing the violence of that day to an affair turned sour. But if she’d been unfaithful in her marriage, she’d been more than discreet. No one recalled her dining or having a drink in what could have been construed a compromising situation. Interviews with friends and neighbors told the story of a woman who when not with family dedicated herself to volunteer activities on behalf of the school, hospital, and church.

Asked if she had enemies, her husband replied that years earlier she’d written editorials to the People’s Forum, excoriating Birchers and KKK that resided and proselytized in the community. She’d mocked their views that Dr. King was a Red and the civil rights movement a mere shill for Communist Revolution. In the weeks following her editorials, she’d received hate mail, but the letter writer was never identified and the threats eventually ceased. Any trail went cold.

Less than a mile away, State Highway 19 ran north and south.  Hitchhikers and other unsavories sometimes strayed onto the county road. Could Mrs. S have been the victim of one of these passersby? Did a serial killer haunt the highway, leaving a trail of death up and down the State?

Dahmer, Bundy, Speck—men like this were out there.

The crime remained unsolved.

Residents of the small town tried to forget, yet found themselves imagining the awful events that occurred while they’d been working, napping, or watching daytime TV. How could this have happened here?

They pretended it hadn’t happened, all the while locking their doors and averting their eyes on the street. They installed motion lights and purchased weapons. Parents called their children in by dark. Women clung together in groups.

No one asked the pretty girls to dance.

Gary V. Powell’s stories and flash fiction have been widely-published in both print and online literary magazines and anthologies including most recently the Thomas Wolfe Review, Fiction Southeast, SmokeLong Quarterly, Atticus Review, and Best New Writing 2015. In addition to winning the 2014 Gover Prize for short-short fiction (Eric Hoffer Foundation), his work has placed in several other national contests including The Press 53 Prize (2012), Glimmer Train Short-Short Contest (2013), and the Thomas Wolfe Fiction Prize (2014). His first novel, Lucky Bastard (Main Street Rag Press, 2012), is available at http://www.authorgaryvpowell.com/debut-novel/

 

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BESTSELLER LIST FOR JULY

 MICHIGAN BESTSELLER LIST TOP 15 FOR JULY 2016

1) Mel Boring, Guinea Pig Scientists: Bold Self-Experimenters in Science and Medicine (Henry Holt and Co.)

2) Christopher Paul Curtis, The Watsons Go to Birmingham—1963 (Laurel-Leaf)

3) Daniel Silva, The Black Widow (Harper)

4) Amy Young, A Unicorn Named Sparkle (Farrar, Straus and Giroux)

5) Tom Stanton, Terror in the City of Champions: Murder, Baseball, and the Secret Society that Shocked Depression-Era Detroit (Lyons Press) [last month #1]

6) Alison DeCamp, My Near-Death Adventures: I Almost Died. Again. (Crown Books for Young Readers)

7) Angela Flournoy, The Turner House: A Face_In_rockNovel (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt) [last month #9]

8) Viola Shipman, The Charm Bracelet: A Novel (Thomas Dunne Books) [last month #13]

9) Loren Graham, A Face in the Rock: The Tale of a Grand Island Chippewa (University of California Press) [last month #8]

10) Steve Hamilton, The Second Life of Nick Mason (G.P. Putnam’s Sons/Penguin Books USA) [last month #3]

11) Deborah Diesen, The Pout-Pout Fish (Farrar, Straus and Giroux)

12) Bonnie Jo Campbell, Mothers, Tell Your Daughters: Stories (W.W. Norton & Company)

13) Shannon Gibney, See No Color (Carolrhoda Lab/Lerner Publishing Group)

14) Stan Tekeila, Birds of Michigan Field Guide (Adventure Publications) [last month #11]

15) Alison DeCamp, My Near-Death Adventures (99% True) (Crown Books for Young Readers)

15) Travis Mulhauser, Sweetgirl: A Novel (Ecco Press/HarperCollins Publishers)

 

UPPER PENINSULA BESTSELLER LIST TOP 15 FOR JULY 2016

1) Alison DeCamp, My Near-Death Adventures: I Almost Died. Again. (Crown Books for Young Readers)

2) Steve Hamilton, The Second Life of Nick Mason (G.P. Putnam’s Sons/Penguin Books USA) [last month #1]

3) Loren Graham, A Face in the Rock: The Tale of a Grand Island Chippewa (University of California Press) [last month #2]

4) Aimée Bissonette, North Woods Girl (Minnesota Historical Society Press)

4) Abe Sauer, Goodnight Loon (University of Minnesota Press) [last month #6]

6) John Smolens, Wolf’s Mouth: A Novel (Michigan State University Press) [last month #13]

7) Alison DeCamp, My Near-Death Adventures (99% True) (Crown Books for Young Readers) [last month #5]

8) Mardi Link, The Drummond Girls: A Story of Fierce Friendship Beyond Time and Chance (Grand Central Publishing)

9) Jerry Dennis, The Living Great Lakes: Searching for the Heart of the Inland Seas (St. Martin’s Press) [last month #8]

10) Mardi Link, Wicked Takes the Witness Stand: A Tale of Murder and Twisted Deceit in Northern Michigan (University of Michigan Press)

11) Mardi Link, When Evil Came to Good Hart: ‘an up north Michigan cold case’ (The University of Michigan Press)

12) Molly Beth Griffin, Rhoda’s Rock Hunt (Minnesota Historical Society Press) [last month #10]

13) Charlie LeDuff, Detroit: An American Autopsy (Penguin Books)

14) Michael Delp and M.L. Liebler, Bob Seger’s House and other Stories (Wayne State University Press) [last month #14]

14) Holling C. Holling, Paddle-to-the-Sea (Sandpiper Books)

The Michigan Best Seller List and Upper Peninsula Bestseller List for July consists of 18 participating Michigan bookstores: Between the Covers in Harbor Springs,facebook.com/btcbookstore; Bookbug in Kalamazoo, bookbugkalamazoo.com; Great Lakes Books & Supply in Big Rapids, greatlakesbook.com; Falling Rock Café & Bookstore in Munising, http://fallingrockcafe.com/; Island Bookstore in Mackinac City and on Mackinac Island, http://www.islandbookstore.com/; Kazoo Books in north Kalamazoo and south Kalamazoo, kazoobooks.com/; McLean and Eakin Bookstore in Petoskey, mcleanandeakin.com; Michigan News Agency in Kalamazoo, http://www.michigannews.biz/; Nicola’s Books in Ann Arbor, nicolasbooks.com; North Wind Books in Hancock, bookstore.finlandia.edu; Pages Bookshop in Detroit, http://www.pagesbkshop.com/; Saturn Booksellers in Gaylord, www.saturnbooksellers.com; Schuler Books & Music in Grand Rapids, Lansing, and Okemos, schulerbooks.com.; and Snowbound Books in Marquette,http://www.snowboundbooks.com/.

 

Michigan’s U.P. poet laureate shares top 10 books from Superior country

ScarpinoTo celebrate the release of, What the Willow Said as It Fell, the new book from Andrea Scarpino, we asked the Upper Peninsula’s poet laureate what her top ten poetry books are with ties to the U.P.

1. A Story of America Goes Walking by Saara Myrene Raappana and Rebekah Wilkins-Pepiton (an absolutely wonderful brand new collaboration of poetry and visual images)

2. In the Land We Imagined Ourselves by Jonathan Johnson

3. Here: Women Writing on Michigan’s Upper Peninsula, edited by Ronald Riekki

4. Errata by Lisa Fay Coutley

5. Voice on the Water: Great Lakes Native America Now, edited by Grace Chaillier and Rebecca Tavernini

6. Small Enterprise by Mary Biddinger

7. Milk Tooth, Levee, Fever by Saara Myrene Raappana

8. How to End Up by Jennifer A. Howard (technically, this is a chapbook of short short stories, but it reads like poetry, and I just love it)

9. Father, Tell Me I Have Not Aged by Russell Thorburn (Russ is the first poet laureate of the UP, and this is my favorite of his collections)

10. Light as Sparrows by Jillena Rose

Scarpino’s book-length poem, out now from Red Hen Press, “bears witness to the body as a site of loss, to chronic pain as an all-encompassing experience, and to the mythological and medical ways we understand the body as it is continually created and lost,” according to the publisher.

“(It) asks the reader to sit with and inside the body’s many losses, to grow comfortable and restless in its vagaries, and to acknowledge the myriad ways the body shapes and informs our lives,” the publisher said in a press release. “Incorporating found poetry, including from her own medical records, and the ash and willow tree as mythological figures, Scarpino writes with lyric intensity from a place of resistance and questioning as she tries to describe, understand, and record chronic pain as a growing epidemic.”

Find the book here.

 

 

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MICHIGAN BESTSELLER LIST FOR JUNE

Screenshot 2016-07-19 15.41.48MICHIGAN BESTSELLER LIST TOP 15 FOR JUNE 2016

1) Tom Stanton–Terror in the City of Champions: Murder, Baseball, and the Secret Society that Shocked Depression-Era Detroit (Lyons Press)

2) Allison Leotta–Last Good Girl: A Novel (Touchstone/Simon & Schuster)

3) Steve Hamilton–The Second Life of Nick Mason (G.P. Putnam’s Sons/Penguin Books)

4) Terry McMillan–I Almost Forgot About You: A Novel (Crown Publishing Group)

5) David Maraniss–Once in a Great City: A Detroit Story (Simon & Schuster)

6) Katie Dalebout–Let It Out: a journey through journaling (Hay House)

7) Julie Lawson Timmer–Untethered: A Novel (G.P. Putnam’s Sons)

8) Loren Graham–A Face in the Rock: The Tale of a Grand Island Chippewa (University of California Press)

9) Angela Flournoy–The Turner House: A Novel (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt)

10) Patricia Abbott–Shot in Detroit (Polis Books)

11) Stan Tekeila–Birds of Michigan Field Guide (Adventure Publications)

12) Mary Emerick–The Geography of Water (University of Alaska Press)

13) Viola Shipman–The Charm Bracelet: A Novel (Macmillan/Thomas Dunne Books)

14) David Means–Hystopia: A Novel (Farrar, Straus and Giroux)

15) Emily St. John Mandel–Station Eleven: A Novel (Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group)

 

UPPER PENINSULA BESTSELLER LIST TOP 15 FOR JUNE 2016

1) Steve Hamilton–The Second Life of Nick Mason (G.P. Putnam’s Sons/Penguin Books USA)

2) Loren Graham–A Face in the Rock: The Tale of a Grand Island Chippewa (University of California Press)

3) Mary Emerick–The Geography of Water (University of Alaska Press)

4) Emily St. John Mandel–Station Eleven: A Novel (Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group)

5) Alison DeCamp–My Near-Death Adventures (99% True!) (Crown Books for Young Readers)

6) Abe Sauer–Good Night Loon (University of Minnesota Press)

7) Joseph Heywood–Buckular Dystrophy (Lyons Press)

8) Jerry Dennis–The Living Great Lakes: Searching for the Heart of the Inland Seas (St. Martin’s Press) [tie]

8) L.E. Kimball–Seasonal Roads (Wayne State University Press) [tie]

10) Molly Beth Griffin–Rhoda’s Rock Hunt (Minnesota Historical Society Press)

11) DeLorme Mapping Company—Michigan Atlas & Gazetteer (DeLorme Publishing)

12) Jim Harrison—The Ancient Minstrel (Grove Press)

13) John Smolens—Wolf’s Mouth (Michigan State University Press)

14) Bonnie Jo Campbell–American Salvage: Stories (Wayne State University Press)

14) Michael Delp and M.L. Liebler—Bob Seger’s House and Other Stories (Wayne State University Press)

14) Steve Hamilton–A Cold Day in Paradise (St. Martin’s Press)

 

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